Posts Tagged ‘strategy’

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Clutter on the Web and my Desk – Siteless Web Presence

My desk is a mess.

Once, in first grade, my teacher – can’t remember the nun’s name – put my entire desk in a box and sent me along with the box to the principal’s office. Then he called my parents in so we could talk about how messy my desk was.

Obviously, the teacher’s plan to shame me into cleaning my desk did not pay off because as I look around right now – I still sit amongst chaos.

Magazines and books that I want to read but haven’t gotten to. But I don’t want to shelve them because then I might forgot them. A calendar and dead lava lamp, tons of papers (not stacked but haphazardly thrown around), my “You’ve been bad jar” for myself and co-workers (it’s usually full of treats but is empty right now – I guess a lot of people have been bad), Chex mix, CDs, pens, pictures of the family, a box of client marketing collateral…any normal person would probably start cleaning it right away but not me.

My mother-in-law says her boss is the same way – that she’s never met anyone cluttered. She doesn’t know how he gets anything done.

I defended him by saying, “That’s how I work. I’ll clean it up and then it’ll be a mess again in a few hours so why bother. I know where mostly everything is. It just looks awful to you.”

In some ways, the web is just like this. There’s not much organization. You have to search for what you want and hope that Google or the other search engines find what you want. If not, you start the search over adding different terms to your search.

It can be frustrating when you can’t find what you are looking for but it can also be exciting when you find something that you never knew was there. And when you find it, you often share it with someone. Because what’s the use of finding something cool if no one knows you’ve found it.

This is another reason for why you should have a siteless web presence. The web isn’t organized. Heirarchies have been replaced. If all you have is one website, you are one against millions and millions of other sites.

You need to be in a lot of places all at once so when someone is doing a search, they may come across you. Maybe it’s not your main site but it can always redirect there.

And, when they do come across you, you have to be interesting enough that they might want to share you with a friend. Because it’s easy to share with friends on the web (del.icio.us, stumble upon, digg – there are lots of social bookmarking sites.)

In fact, you should put this on your site. It’s from Add this! It’s easy and free and can’t hurt unless your website is painful to use and ugly – then you might get some unexpected traffic from people making fun of you and your company.

Funny story about that. I was once sitting in a meeting when a client brought up the fact that their website actually cost them business. The prospect had pointed out that if they were such a wonderful technology software company then why did their website look like a grade school student had put it together. Ouch.

If you have problems like this, then come see us at Mediasauce.com. We’ll help you out.

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Siteless Web Presence Part Two or why not be in all places at once?

So how do you get a siteless web presence?

Your website is one place on the web. One place that Google can direct traffic. When a person does a search for your site then you’ll hopefully pop up. If you have the right kind of URL, Title Tags, Meta Tags, and enough relevant content about you on the home page.

Now I’m not saying you need to talk about yourself a lot – just the right keywords. And I’m never into talking about myself too much – you should be talking to your customers, telling your story, and explaining your unique benefits.

Maybe tomorrow I’ll post a blog on what kind of tags you should be using and how they work on a website. Anybody interested in that?

Anyway, back to siteless web presence, after your Google search on your website, other sites pop up. Are they your competitors or just useless information that Google pulls out of the web universe?

You should dominate that page, right? You don’t want a competitor sitting right below you or above you if they know what they are doing with search and you don’t.

You can with a siteless web presence. If you take your content and put it out on other websites that are consistently searched by Google then soon you will begin to dominate Google searches. Now this doesn’t work for all searches but when it comes to a search for you, you should be there.

Here’s what I’ve done for my company, MediaSauce. Now this isn’t guaranteed. It’s a work in progress all the time because Google is constantly updating its algorithm and indexing more and more sites.

Search for MediaSauce through Google.

We come up right away. Then there are links to some blogs where people mentioned us and then there’s a software company that sells a product named MediaSauce (they used to dominate our page but I’m trying to work them down off the front page) then there are our blogs and our Flickr account.

Now how is it that just a few mentions in an outside blog can drive a link in the middle of my search page. Well, it’s all about Google believing that the content is relevant to MediaSauce. Which it is. And I’m going to give the blogger, Jenny Lu, some Google love by pinging her back with this blog.

But our siteless presence that I can control deals more with putting our content on outside sites, putting the right information in about our company and tagging it appropriately so Google can see it and index it.

Now as far as I know there isn’t a set of steps you can do that will automatically work. It’s more trial and error and if anyone knows a set of steps, please fill me in. But what I’ve found that works is making sure you are constantly updating your external sites as much as you update your own website. By adding more and more relevant content.

Here’s what ad agency, Modernista, did. They took it to an extreme but I think it’s very powerful. Having a site like this is not for everyone and I am in no way saying you shouldn’t have a website.

I’m saying you need to also have a siteless web presence which means letting people take your stuff and put it wherever they feel like it on the web.

Take for example, you sell something in retail – maybe shoes. You have your little store in Broadripple and you are just getting into online selling. Some of your customers that are farther away are starting to buy online and you are promoting it as best you can.

What I would do to give myself a siteless web presence…I would take photos of all the shoes and put them up on Flickr or Photobucket or Smugmug with links back to my website for purchase.

I would take videos of models (my employees with good feet) walking around in my beautiful shoes. I would put them on many video sites using heyspread.com or just doing the standard youtube.com.

I would make a widget using Slide pulling from Flickr and then put that on my blog about shoes (you need a blog, just get over it and do it where I talk about shoes).

I would also allow people to take the slide widget off my website if they want so they can put it on their facebook or myspace profile or wherever they want.

I would get a cool technology company to build me a retail selling widget based on my store so if someone wanted to take my retail store and put it on their site, they could. I would take this widget and put it on my profile pages.

Then I would visit other people’s shoe blogs and talk (positively – no need to flame anyone here) about their shoes and leave behind my link or small slide widget on their forum or blog. I wouldn’t promote my own shoes but I would join the conversations and let people follow the links if they wanted.

Then I would be very careful to watch my conversions in my online presence. Is stuff working or is it not? I would watch my analytics to see if people were using the widgets or visiting the site. Then adjust.

And I would search myself on Google and make sure I was easy to find and I dominated my page…I would work on getting into other searches like basic shoe searches for the brand names I carry, etc… but that’s a blog for another time.

I feel like this blog isn’t finished. There’s so much more I would do but these are some of the basics. Siteless web presence is getting your name out on other sites instead of just trying to get them to come to you. Go where the people are.

What do you think?

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Work Smarter, Not Harder: Benefits of a Digital Strategy

With the proliferation of so many shiny digital tools over the past few years, who hasn’t been quick to add the latest and greatest tool only to find out that it hasn’t solved the problem it was intended to eliminate?  Instead, we’re left with another partial solution and different kinds of problems. 

Over time, these tools have accumulated and become an administrative burden that stretches the team too thin and created less-than-desired results.  Instead of leveraging the powerful collaboration tools of today’s internet (blogs, social networks, wikis, etc.), most organizations are working with static websites, mass email marketing blasts, and other one-way communication vehicles.  [I've seen a few organizations who're working with upwards of 8-10 different email newsletters to the same audience!] 

Unfortunately, a good portion of these organizations have been lulled into thinking their menagerie of digital tools is on the leading edge, instead of the patchwork solutions they really are.  

To borrow a metaphor from a client from my days of fundraising, these organizations are like the person who builds a house and then later decides to put an addition onto it.  Then adds another one later on.  And another.  And another.  Until this person is left with a monstrosity of house that has plenty of bells and whistles, but has been put together in an ad hoc way that creates more inefficiencies than it does benefits.    

Let’s admit it.  It’s time to step back to consider what you can do to transform your digital presence so that you’re staying ahead of the curve, not trying to catch up.  It’s time for a digital strategy. 

Other related posts:

Above the Canopy: The Value of a Strategic Viewpoint

Strategy First, Tools Second 

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Siteless Web Presence Part One or why not be in all places at once?

Last week I spoke of a siteless web presence. And what I meant by that comment was that you need to stop thinking of your website as a destination stop and more of aggregator of all your web content. Pretty simple, huh?

But first things first. Your website should be a living breathing thing on the web. If you don’t know how to update your site – or if you need your web guy to do it then you need a new website. One with a CMS (content management system) behind it. Updates should be frequent and relevant – so you can get some Google love.

BTW, this doesn’t have to be expensive – it can be almost free if you don’t mind taking some time to piecemeal things together on the web like making a WordPress blog into a full blown site and adding interesting information widgets like Google calendars/maps and cool stuff from Widget Box. There’s a lot more out there – these are just examples.

But looking at your website and saying this is the end-all be-all of my existent on the web is a mistake especially if you are making good content and treating your website like the media property it should be. You should be and can be everywhere at once.

(By media property, I mean you are treating it like a TV/news channel where you are throwing out good entertaining education on your products – and don’t ask me what these things are – you know what they are, you are a consumer. You’ve seen other websites product videos or blogs or forums or whatever and thought “Hey, that’s pretty cool.” That’s what I’m talking about.)

I kinda rambling today with all these tangents but I swear I will get back to my topic. Look here it is.

Siteless web presence means that you are putting your web information out in multiple locations on the web and making sure that people can take your information with them – if they want. One example would be that if you make a video – it should go on your site but it also should be out in all the places where people watch videos like YouTube and Revver and everywhere. You can even do it all at once with HeySpread.com.

Another thing – Don’t ask me why they would take it. I don’t read minds. But I will tell that they do take it for whatever reason. They take it and mash it up on their website or they use your product video in a blog they are writing.

So how do you get a siteless web presence?

I’ll save that for later this week.

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How to make a Google Map for my company?

After our last seminar, Social Media Mania, I received an email from an attendee about how to make a Google Map specific to their business. You know the kind where you have the little blue icon instead of a red one.

Here’s what I wrote her.

If you don’t have an account with Google, then sign up. It’s easy and free. I would recommend you make the gmail account for your company name like yourcompany@gmail.com. This way it can be easily transferred to another marketer down the road.

Once you have an account, go to Google Maps.

There will be a tab call My Maps. Click on it.

Google My Maps

Click Create A Map.

Make a name for your map.

Make sure it’s set to Public.

Google Map for MediaSauce

Search for your location.

When it gives the red location spot, click on the it on the map.

Google Map for MediaSauce

It will say “Save to My Maps”

Click that link.

It will say “Which map would you like to save to?”

Select the “named” map.

You’ll have your map.

Google Map for MediaSauce

Then to add it to your website.

Click on “Link to this page” on the far right corner of the map.

There you can get the link or the HTML code to add to your site.

Google Map for MediaSauce

Now here’s something cool. Google lets you edit your business information and I totally recommend this.

To do this, get out of your Maps and then do a search for your business. Hopefully, it pops up.

Then click on the red dot on the map that shows your business location. There will be an “edit” button.

Click that link and set up your business.

At the end, they will call your business to verify you are the owner. They will give you a four-digit code. Put that in and your business will be on the map with more information than just a location.

Google Map for MediaSauce

Now you know how to do it yourself.

Google Maps makes it easier on people to find your location and anything that makes it easier on your customers is worth putting on your website.

Here’s an example.

And here’s one with an actual path from location to location.

If your locations are moving or you want people to enter their information and then it just show up on a map, MediaSauce has done this for customers as well.

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Inc. Mag, Social Communities, and Google

Here’s my two cents about Inc. Mag. And don’t get me wrong – I love the mag – but they are always a bit behind the times when it comes to new media and technology. I really miss Business 2.0 – I can’t believe they shut it down and replaced my 2.0 with Fortune – what a waste.

So with the article, “Tapping The Community Pool” in the latest issue, they basically talk about how Social Communities via forums or wikis or blogs are allowing customers to help answer each other questions about products. Wow, that’s so 2003.

The example they give is a pool company (www.poolcenter.com) that has a large forum with 5000 registered users. They have their techs online to answer any questions about their products but a lot of times other customers answer the question before an online tech can get to it.

I don’t know if any of you have a Treo, but Palm’s entire support is based in community forums and a lot of times you can’t even get a tech to answer you. They just redirect you to another customer’s post on how to solve a problem.

I’m a huge fan of Ning and they have two communities for support – both creators and developers. Both of these are filled with workarounds and tips from other customers.

I’ve always pushed for community development around any company’s service or product. Now I almost always get somebody who will tell me they don’t need a full blown social community – that there is too many already. The funny thing is that this is usually from someone that doesn’t use any social communities. There’s a cartoon out there floating around (I should have saved the link) showing a guy signing up for a social community network. Afterwards he says, “That’s it. I officially have more social networks than friends.”

That’s probably the case for me.

I’ve got Facebook, my church, my wellness doctor, my family, my company, my marketing network, linkedin, twitter, and this damn blog.

Maybe you think that is too many…but I don’t think so. I think we go in and out of social communities all day long – the net just made them virtual and gave them names.

A little future gazing here – but I believe that our social identities will become more and more important on the web to the fact that websites will change when we visit them depending on the profile we are using to visit them. I’m also into siteless web presence for companies (you don’t need a website as much as you need a presence on many, many websites) as well but I’ll talk about that in a different blog.

Wow, I’ve really gotten far away from my topic. What I wanted to say about the article is that they don’t mention how much Google loves forums, blogs and wikis. There’s a whole host of reasons that I’ll explain in the future but Google digs the relevant content, the new content, the old content, all the keywords and a whole host of other things associated with these communities and there’s a good chance your community will pop up before your website.

And if Google can see you, then the world can. They don’t even mention that in the article.

To prove my point, search for me on Google. Don Schindler. A while back this guy with my exact same name used to dominate Google because he was a Scientologist and he wrote a few articles. But not anymore.

So this blog is a little longer than I wanted.

Remember this though, maybe you don’t think a community is right for you now. Well, all I have to say is, imagine how hard it will be to start one five years from now. The web is in its infancy and you could build an established base right now.

And if you need help, MediaSauce (who I work for) can help you out. You don’t have to go this alone and you’d be surprised how inexpensive it is to set this stuff up.

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You upgraded your website – do you need to upgrade your marketer?

No!!!!! The last thing you need to do is replace the person who knows your company inside and out and is dedicated to spreading the word about your success.

But you do need to understand that they probably need some love and attention.

For a small business, having a marketer is a true benefit. Most of the time it’s the CEO or President or the new intern who just came on board (BTW, that is a seriously bad move – the last person I would want to be giving first impressions about my company is the new intern – no matter how cute they are).

But that marketer may need some help. This is no longer a world of brochures, radio spots, TV ads and tradeshows. Or even static brochure-like websites.

Your “new” marketer needs to understand the basics of new media – especially if you, like many others, believe that the web is the most efficient way to reach new customers and reconnect with old ones.

Your marketer is used to start and stop flight dates. They are used to working hard on brochures and flowery language or a biannual magazine and huge annual report. They may not even be used rules of social networking, blogs and forums.  They may not understand what a widget can do.

So instead of shouting at them to get these new Web 2.0 components online, maybe you should be asking the marketer what kind of education do you need before we jump in and start conversing on the net.

Let me tell you – they aren’t going to get that from a one-time seminar from MediaSauce or by reading a book. They need to be immersed in it. They need to spend some time learning and USING Web 2.0 things before they start a social community or a blog or a forum.

I’ve set up hundreds of social tools. Some have done great and some have failed miserably. There have been almost none in between. What was the difference? The marketer behind the wheel. If he/she understood how to use the tools, how to listen to the audience and participate, the social tool flourished.

If you are thinking that you don’t need these kinds of things for your business, then I wonder why you are even reading this blog. There’s some irony for you.

Here’s a list of things that I believe your marketer needs to know before you go Web 2.0:

  1. Enthusiasm for the possibilities of the web – if they are not on board, don’t force it. They will sabotage the online effort and then tell you “I told you so.”
  2. Learn the nuances of social networking as a person not a marketer. Social media marketing must be authentic and subtle. If you are shouting about how great you and your product are, they will black hat you in a heartbeat.  If you want to know where to start socializing, then email me and I’ll tell you.
  3. Learn some HTML – seriously. It’s not that difficult. And it’s part of the job. If they have to hunt down the web guy every time they need something done on your website then you are wasting both the web guy’s and the marketer’s time.
  4. Experiment with different tools. There are tons and tons of great FREE resources out there. Don’t buy the first one you see or use. Never get locked into technology unless you know they are stable in the marketplace (like Google). In other words, there are ways to get things done by mashing new technologies together instead of buying a custom solution. Like for instance, this wordpress site can actually be made into a normal looking website with a great CMS tool behind it.

There are many other things that marketers need now.  Don’t expect your in-house guy or gal to be able to pull off every little marketing thing that comes along.

Prioritize the marketing list.  If you are updating brochures every couple of months and they are sweating over every last detail of the brochure, you might want to go digital so they can change things on the fly.

Technology is supposed to make our lives easier, right?  Well, for marketers, it makes it harder because now you guys want us to do all the new stuff and maintain the old ways of marketing.  You can’t have both unless you add more hands.

Maybe this is all wrong and most marketers out there would like to keep doing the same things year after year but if you aren’t doing social media now, how hard do you think this job will be in five years when you are just getting into it.  I personally like to learn when everyone else is.

What do you think?

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Fox is crowdsourcing – why shouldn’t you?

Here’s the article from Cynopsis Digital for website of the day:

Fox has hired online crowdsourcing firm Passenger to build an online community of viewers around Fox shows to help executives make more informed programming and marketing decisions. Passenger will help the network test programming concepts, plot direction, character evolution and marketing schemes by empowering a group of dedicated users to chime in during the development process. Passenger is one of a few cutting edge firms entertainment studios are working with to the help ping the crowd before committing millions of dollars to production and marketing budgets, (a trend I will be exploring in a panel on crowdsourcing at the NATPE LATV Festival next month.) They also recently worked with Damon Lindelof and Carton Cuse, the showrunners of ABC’s Lost, to help determine which episode to submit to Emmy voters this year, (not an easy task for a serialized show.) The first order of business for Fox community members will be to offer feedback on Fox’s fall line up.

I know you are looking at me and saying, “What the heck is crowdsourcing?”

Here’s what Wikipedia says, “Crowdsourcing is a neologism for the act of taking a task traditionally performed by an employee or contractor, and outsourcing it to an undefined, generally large group of people, in the form of an open call. For example, the public may be invited to develop a new technology, carry out a design task, refine an algorithm or help capture, systematize or analyze large amounts of data (see also citizen science).”

To me, it’s getting your online customers involved in whatever you are doing. There are people very interested in what you do if you give them a voice.

A lot of marketers aren’t too interested in the crowd because of the work involved (communities require constant care and attention in the beginning like a new plant but once they take root you can watch them grow) and they tend to throw you curveballs. Like you swore something would work but then it didn’t – as a marketer – you can blame a half of dozen different things. But with crowdsourcing and communities, you have a lot of real feedback and if they don’t like your idea – then your idea sucked not the other excuses.

Anyway, I’m glad Fox is going this way with their line-up. Who knows maybe TV won’t suck in the future?

What do you think?

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Above the Canopy: The Value of a Strategic Viewpoint

How much time are you spending just keeping up with producing the various content it takes to market and promote your company?  How about the content you need to communicate your vision, values, and philosophies to your internal audiences and other stakeholders?

In more than a few recent conversations with different organizations, it has become apparent that people are having a hard time keeping up with pushing out their message and are spending little to no time on learning new ways to connect their messages to their audiences (and vice versa) – let alone finding ways to help their audience help them spread the word.

I’m a big fan of Stephen Covey and still remember reading 7 Habits of Highly Successful People and number of his other books (check out his new web community).  As a presenter and writer, he understands the power of visual models.  The power of showing how you can fill a glass vessel (your day) full by starting with the big rocks (important tasks), then smaller stones (minor tasks), and finally sand (trivial tasks).  And when you try it the opposite way, it doesn’t work.

As I was driving on the road today, I pulled another one from my memory banks that relates directly to the problem of keeping up with content vs. finding new ways to share that content.  It’s the metaphor of how leaders are like adventurers hacking through the jungle with machetes.  By following your compass (your values & principles), you can navigate the dense, thick jungle.  

However, it is crucial to climb a ladder from time to time to find the horizon.  When you peak above the forest canopy, you will see where you are in relation to the goal and can adjust your path accordingly.  And, more importantly, you can make sure you’re even in the right forest.  Because, why put all that effort, if you’re not.

As I think about those organizations who are struggling to keep up with generating content to fill their communication vehicles, I know they can all benefit from climbing the ladder and seeing if there’s a better way out of the jungle.  In just the past couple years, we have seen some amazing new communication tools come of age, making life much easier for everyone using them (FacebookFriendFeedYouTubeTwitter, etc.)

Taking a comprehensive look at your digital presence will help you figure out how to best integrate recent concepts like blogs, social networks, Twitter, RSS feeds, and a host of other social media that make it easier and more enjoyable to share your powerful story with the world and let them tell it for you.  

What are some of the things you doing today that you might be able to stop and replace with something better?

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Filling in the Spaces: Blogs, Podcasts, Social Networks, and Twitter

Think about your typical week.  How many stories do you share with people in that seven-day span?  I’m not talking about highly polished literary works.  I’m talking about the everyday stories you tell about your experiences, views on the world, and interactions with others.

It’s only a guess, but I think we each have about 10-15 stories we tell throughout a typical week.  It might be a story about something funny that happened over the weekend.  It might be an important life lesson you learned when you were a kid.  It might be your opinion why one political candidate is better than other.  It might be about a funny YouTube video, television episode, or movie you watched.

Unless you’re writing a regular newspaper column, hosting a television newscast, or part of the talk radio mafia, chances are pretty high that your 10-15 stories aren’t getting told to a very wide audience.  And, you’re probably not sharing every story with every person.   Most likely, you’re sporadically sharing your stories with just a few people before you shift your attention to new stories.

Depending upon how frequent you talk to someone, you might only tell 1 or 2 of these stories to them.  Just think of the last time you talked with a long-time friend or family member you haven’t seen in awhile.  When that happens to me, I find myself hitting the major events of my life without sharing some of my sweetest moments (e.g. “My brother and his family moved to Washington” while leaving out “I was amazed to hear my son practice piano last night – he’s really playing some beautiful, complicated pieces.”).  

Now, let’s look at the same concept, but from an organizational perspective.  How many worthwhile stories are you sharing with the world?  Maybe it’s your philosophy about sustainability.  Or your commitment to outstanding customer service.  Or how you seek out the right talent and help them become world-class at their jobs.  

If you are like most organizations, your most important stories are being told on a sporadic basis without much consistency to the key audiences you want to reach – internal and external.  If they’re being told at all, they’re most like showing up in tepid brochures.  

This is where blogs, podcasts, social networks, and Twitter can become very powerful for you.  Each of these tools allows you to fill in the spaces between your usual interactions with your key audiences.  They give you the ability to capture and distill your key stories with anyone who connects to them – no matter if you already know the person or not.  Without a doubt, they can help strengthen existing relationships and create new ones.

Here’s a quick primer of each:

  • Blogs – you’re reading one right now.  It’s short for “web log” and has evolved from a personal diary/journal into an interactive column of sorts.  They can take a variety of forms: breaking newsdetailed analysisstories and links from other sources, and observations about various events and trends.
  • Podcasts - These “Play On Demand” audio and video serials are like bite-sized radio and tv shows.  Individuals and companies typically produce podcasts to share regular viewpoints, updates, and news items.  People usually download onto MP3 players and other devices to listen on the go.  They have become widespread on college campuses, especially for listening to class lectures.
  • Social networks - whether you’re on a general audience social network (Facebook or LinkedIn) or a private one for a specific organization or niche group, these usually consist of each person filling out a profile page, forging connections with other people within the network, posting their thoughts through discussion forums and blogs, and sharing video and audio content with others in the network.
  • Microblogs (Twitter) – still not yet in use by the mainstream, you’ve probably at least heard about Twitter in the news.  Twitter and its many competitors are hybrids of blogs and social networks.  The main concept is to share what you’re doing at that very moment with whomever has decided to follow your posts.  These posts can run the gamut from the mundane (“going to the store for milk”) to the profound (“just posted a new blog containing detailed research findings about life on Mars”).  What I like most about Twitter and its kin is that they give me a glimpse into the everyday lives of interesting people (follow me to find out).

Which ones are right for you?  It depends on what results you’re seeking to achieve.  I’d recommend starting by articulating your vision and goals.  With those in mind, you can build an integrated strategy that incorporates the right mix of tools to reach your desired audiences.  

No matter the strategy, the first step is getting familiar with each and seeing how others are using them.  

What have been your experiences with each of these?  Are they useful to you?

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